George Soros Explains How The Chance For An Open Society Was Missed

In 1947, George Soros arrived at the London School of Economics and set about building a career as a financial expert he was also learning much about the philosophical idea of the open society. As George Soros worked his way through school as a kitchen porter and waiter he was learning about the open society at the hands of his mentor and philosophy teacher, the Austrian philosopher Karl Popper; both Popper and Soros faced the threat of Nazi Germany in their home nations and shared a view that a totalitarian regime could not provide a democratic and free society.

George Soros would go on to become one of the world’s leading hedge fund managers and financial experts with a personal fortune rated at over $25 billion, much of which Soros has used to fund the work of his own Open Society Foundations which has been at the heart of much of the charitable work completed across the planet. The open society allows the free exchange of knowledge and information, along with the free movement of people across borders to create more diverse and understanding communities. In an article written by George Soros for The Atlantic, the Hungarian born financial expert explained his charitable network spent much of the 1970s and 80s fighting to bring down the Communist regime in power across Eastern Europe.

Following the fall of the Berlin Wall, Soros found his work shift towards the construction of the open society, which he felt could be constructed in the wake of the end of Communism as a divisive dogma across many nations.After spending the ‘Cold War’ years fighting the totalitarian regime of Communism, George Soros believed the best chance in history was available for democratic governments to develop an open society in the image of that recommended by Karl Popper; Soros now believes this opportunity was missed as many Western powers began to look inward as they felt the issue of Communism had been defeated in the early 1990s.

Instead of building a better future for all, George Soros believes the majority of communities in the former Eastern Bloc have been damaged by a speedy shift towards a capitalist society based on those seen in North America and Western Europe. Soros believes the capitalist threat is as real as the so-called ‘red-threat’ of the 1950s and 60s because there is no ideological option challenging capitalism for dominance in the 21st-century. The work of Karl Popper explained any political ideology seen as dominant and unchallenged was already failing which is why the work of Soros and his Open Society Foundations has now focused on fighting social justice failings across the U.S., Africa, Asia, and Europe.